Around the Bowl

Soups of the world – Recipes from around the globe & some creations of my own


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Beef Ramen – The Versatile Japanese Soup

Ramen is complex and simple at the same time.
Why complex? Well, If you try to unravel its secrets or to find the definite and true recipe you can go mad on the process; there are as many versions as regions or cooks in Japan and all around the globe! Making the broth from scratch takes a lot of time, ingredients and patience, but that probably might be the key to a good ramen, then it is possible to be as playful as you desire with the toppings and garnishes! By the way, the home-made ramen stock reminds me of the Spanish cocido broth because of its meat cuts and cooking method, it’s interesting to find this connection points between such two different and distant cultures through their cuisine.
And why simple? Because ramen also allows to be simplified and transform into a healthy, delicious and creative dish for the every-day easy to put together meal. I just use a good quality stock and the rest is pure inspiration!
Although I usually choose to go for the extremely simplified version of this soup, I love this guide to Ramen, it provides a lot information classified in a very clarifying way, its like the Ramen encyclopedia!

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Doenjang Jjigae – Korean Miso Soup

Hello my foodie friends! I’m sorry for my short disappearance, I have had a busy week, but I’m back to share a delicious and spicy Korean hotpot! Sometimes I have the feeling that this look like a spicy food blog, but I can’t help it, I love it! I think about 70% of everything I cook is spicy or at least very fragrant. Is not that we don’t enjoy a delicate Mediterranean dish at home as well, but there is an undeniable trend here…

Doenjang is the Korean miso, made of fermented soybean paste and Jjigae basically means stew.  I adapted today’s dish from this recipe in Beyond Kimchee site, a great blog to learn or initiate into Korean food. The fermented soybean paste is not hot, but very salty and strong-flavoured and it gives the stews and soups a very particular flavour.

Let’s cook our Doenjang Jjigae?

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Sukiyaki – Japanese Beef Nabemono (Hot Pot)

At home we are big fans of Japanese culture, including food, of course. A couple of years ago while celebrating a birthday in a Japanese restaurant in our area, we discovered Sukiyaki and immediately knew we were going to try it at home and so we did! Is really very easy to prepare once you got the right ingredients.

Sukiyaki is basically a sauce simmered in a hot-pot at the table centre where all the ingredients (beef, tofu, mushrooms and vegetables) are slowly cooked while eating.  Udon are added at the end to soak the rest of the broth.

My approach to it is slightly simplified and I served everything already cooked in a big flat pot at the centre of the table, or sometimes in separates bowls, including the udon. I also add stock to the sauce because we like ours “soupy”

The sauce ingredients are the same you would use in a basic udon soup, check out the recipe Francesca, from SicilySelfies kindly gave me the other day, you’ll find it at the Vietnamese Pho Chay post comments.

Prepare those chopsticks and let’s dig in!

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Hungarian Gulyás (Goulash) – The Stew(ish) Soup

Gulyás (aka Goulash) is the Hungarian most famous dish celebrity and many of us think of it as a stew, however in Hungary it is also considered and served as a soup. In Budapest I had it both ways: it was more stewish in the Christmas street market and in Hungarian typical food restaurants and more soupy in modern cuisine restaurants. Any Hungarian out there to shed some light on the subject?

Gulyás is usually served along with Csipetkes, small pinched noodles made of flour and eggs very common in Hungarian soups and stews, they are very similar to German Spätzles.

I’m very fond of this dish because it was one of the first “ethnic” recipes I discovered and prepared as a teenager; I recall I even made the Csipetkes to go with it from scratch and serve it to my family that always supported me in my cooking adventures.

The key to a tasty Gulyás is a good paprika much more than the beef cut or anything else on the recipe, so arm yourself with your paprika and let’s cook!

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Korean Spicy Beef Soup

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It’s time for a Korean Soup! I’ve got my inspiration for this recipe from Aeri’s Kitchen. I used the common base ingredients in most of her soups and combined them with the ones in my fridge and was really happy with the outcome.

I think is pretty obvious just by taking a look at this blog that I have a taste for Asian food and Korean is not an exception, I love it too!  I’ve been to some random Korean restaurants (outside Korea, which I’ve never been to yet) that I would like to recommend in case you happen to visit or live in any of these cities: The Seoul House Korean Restaurant in Budapest, at the Buda side of the Danube (1011 Budapest Fő utca 8) serves great Korean food with a very attentive service in a very peculiar ambiance decorated with the 1988 Seoul Olympics theme and the Restaurant Coréen Kim in Strasbourg (5, place de l’Hôpital, Strasbourg, 67000) with an excellent varied menu.

Unfortunately I don’t have any Korean restaurant nearby, but luckily there are very generous bloggers out there to help me cook some nice Korean food when I fancy it. In this recipe I used the local veggies available since  I don’t have access to Korean vegetables and mushrooms, but if you do, switch them freely. Also, you can easily make it non-spicy if desired and change the kind of meat according to what you have at hand and even add some noodles.

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